Articles Tagged with litigation

Last week, in Michigan v. EPA, the U.S. Supreme Court held that it was unreasonable for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) to refuse to consider costs in connection with its finding that it was “appropriate and necessary” to regulate hazardous air pollutant (“HAP”) emissions from power plants under the federal Clean Air Act (“CAA”).

By way of background, the CAA instructs EPA to regulate HAP emissions from power plants if it concludes that regulation is “appropriate and necessary.”  The “appropriate and necessary” language stems from the 1990 CAA amendments, wherein Congress established a procedure for determining the applicability of the HAP program to power plants.  Those amendments require EPA to regulate power plants as ordinary major sources if, after conducting several studies, EPA finds that it is “appropriate and necessary.”

After EPA completed the required studies in 1998, it concluded that regulation of power plants was in fact “appropriate and necessary.”  EPA’s “appropriate” finding was based on a conclusion that power plants emitted mercury and other HAPs which posed a risk to human health and the environment and that emission reduction controls were available.  EPA’s “necessary” finding was based on its conclusion that then-existing requirements did not eliminate risks.  In conjunction with its conclusions, EPA determined that “costs should not be considered” in determining whether power plant HAPs should be regulated.  A Regulatory Impact Analysis issued by EPA estimated that EPA’s decision would cost power plants $9.6 billion per year, whereas quantifiable regulatory benefits would be worth $4 to 6 million per year.

As an update to a previous write-up on the deadline for compliance with the new California Industrial General Permit for Stormwater (General Permit), the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) has continued the deadline for registration and compliance from July 1, 2015 to August 14, 2015.

In a notice circulated on the original deadline for compliance, July 1, 2015, the State Water Board acknowledged that its web-based database for stormwater compliance (SMARTS) was experiencing technical issues which were limiting registration access.

As a result, the State Water Board extended the deadline for registration from July 1, 2015 to August 14, 2015.  This extended deadline should enable those industrial facilitiesdirty-pipe-water-300x199 that were either unaware of the July 1, 2015 deadline or those struggling to meet that deadline to timely register.