Update on San Francisco Case Halting AB32: Judge makes final his ruling to put California’s greenhouse gas bill on hold

Climate Change

CongressLast month, we reported on the tentative ruling issued by a San Francisco Superior Court judge calling into question the fate of California’s Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (better known as AB32). (Click here for the previous blog post.)

Well, last week, Judge Ernest Goldsmith affirmed that ruling. His final order halts implementation of AB32 because the California Air Resources Board violated CEQA (the California Environmental Quality Act) by failing to adequately consider certain alternatives to the cap-and-trade system CARB was set to implement. But, all you AB32 fans out there, don’t you worry your pretty little heads!! The ruling does not completely dispose of the law – it simply requires that CARB follow CEQA’s (mainly procedural) rules before they can progress to implementation of the law. CARB has said it will appeal the decision.
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Does GHG Stand for “Go! Halt! Go!”?: Bill that would block EPA’s GHG regulations passes House committee

Climate Change

CongressAs I am sure you already guessed, the answer to my silly question in the title to this post is “no”… but it sure seems like that could be the case recently! Tuesday, the House Energy and Commerce Committee passed a bill, known as the “Energy Tax Prevention Act” proposed by Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), that would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from regulating greenhouse gases (GHGs) by defining GHGs out of the jurisdiction of the Clean Air Act.

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Goodbye Perc, Hello Green Dry Cleaning: EPA approves California regulations banning PERC by 2023

Air Quality

Dry CleanersThis week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its approval of California’s regulations banning the use of perchloroethylene (also known as perc and tetrachloroethylene) in dry cleaning operations by 2023. EPA is required to regulate the use of perc by dry cleaners pursuant to the Clean Air Act. However, its approval of California’s rules means the replacement of EPA’s federal regulations with the state’s more stringent ones and sends California on its way to becoming the first perc-free dry cleaning state.
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